Photo itinerary: two weeks in Iran

We spent two months traveling in Iran, but not everyone can do the same! We’re often asked for suggestions about Iran itineraries, so without further ado: here’s our suggested two week Iran travel itinerary. Includes tips on what to see, where to stay, how to get off the beaten track, and an interactive map.

 

From glorious Islamic architecture to bustling markets, unexplored islands to skiing and rock climbing, the fabric of Iran is a diverse and intricate tapestry. But all this splendor makes it difficult to decide where to go. So much to see, so little time!

We spent two months traversing Iran, both on and off the beaten track. Alas, not everyone has two months to spend in Iran, so we assembled two week Iran travel itinerary for those more pressed for time.

 

A two week photo itinerary for Iran. Includes top places to visit in Iran, things to see in each city, where to stay, and travel times between destinations. Save this if you're considering travel to Iran!

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Lost With Purpose’s two week Iran travel itinerary

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The Route Map - Lost With Purpose

Iran in two weeks

Alternative destinations

It is now possible to book and pay for buses and flights online with 1stQuest. Check here for buses, and check here for flights.

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Fruit juice stall in Tehran, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Getting serious about fresh juice in Tehran

Days 1-3: Tehran

Tehran, the capital of Iran, is not the easiest of introductions. It’s busy, congested, polluted, and vast. Plenty of people will tell you to not waste your time, and beeline straight to more noteworthy places.

We disagree. Tehran has plenty to offer, if you let it.

Tehran’s Grand Bazaar, for instance. The largest in the country, it is estimated that ⅓ of all goods sold in Iran flow through its narrow lanes at one time or another. It’s a sensory overload, and can get super crowded in the middle of the day, but it’s a bazaar not to be missed. You can easily spend the better part of a day in and around the bazaar, and we recommend you do just that!

Once the bazaar becomes too much of a hassle, you can retreat to the relative calm of Tehran’s numerous parks. Let the greenery relax your mind for a bit before you’re inevitably barraged with requests for selfies!

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Stock traders in the Tehran Bazaar in Iran - Lost With Purpose

Traders at the stock market on the second floor of Tehran’s bazaar

Top things to see in Tehran

  • Grand Bazaar: Tehran’s most bustling bazaar. Head here early if you want a bit of relative peace and quiet. If dodging men with carts is more your style, brave the crowds of the afternoon. Don’t count on finding food here once evening sets in.
  • Golestan Palace: Tehran’s most famous attraction… and the most costly at 600,000 rial (likely more by now) to enter. A UNESCO world heritage site, it’s a former palace dating back to the Qajar era featuring several bedazzled halls and rooms.
  • Borj-e Milad (Milad Tower): A towering outlook over Tehran’s city, and a good place to watch the sunset. Make sure the day is clear before paying to head up the tower!
  • Borj-e Azadi (Azadi Tower): Tehran’s iconic archway, popular with locals and foreigners alike.
  • Imam Khomeini Shrine: Mentioned it in our off the beaten track itinerary, this under-appreciated shrine is a great spot for a day trip. Budget travelers, don’t miss it — entrance is free!
  • Park-e Jamshidieh: A chill park in the foothills of northern Tehran. Bring picnic materials, or just sit and wait for some friendly Iranians to approach you for some conversation!
  • Darband: A chill riverside area where you can escape the hustle and bustle and enjoy some riverside kebabs and hookah. Against the Compass has a great post on Darband.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Park-e Shahr in central Tehran, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Park-e Shahr in central Tehran. Who says Tehran is all concrete and fumes?

Where to stay in Tehran

As you could expect from the capital, Tehran has plenty of hotels. Because the city is so big, we are reluctant to give recommendations.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Traffic on the streets of Tehran - Lost With Purpose

Traffic on Tehran’s streets can get a little hectic…

Transportation times from Tehran

  • Bus to Qom: 1.5 hours
  • Train to Qom: 2 hours
  • Bus to Kashan: 3 hours
  • Train to Kashan: 4 hours

Finding the right bus in Tehran can be a real nightmare, as bus stations are crowded and chaotic. Save yourself some stress and book buses online with 1stQuest

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Hazrat-e Masumeh shrine in Qom, Iran

The Hazrat-e Masumeh Shrine in Qom by Fulvio Spada

Day 4: Qom

The second holiest city in Iran, and an important city in the run-up to the revolution, Qom is a logical stopover on your way to Kashan or Esfahan, or as a day trip from Tehran. It’s a very pious city, due to its large theological institutes, and houses the magnificent shrine to the sister of Imam Reza.

If you don’t have the time to make it to holy Mashhad in the north, Qom is a good alternative as far as holy cities go.

Tip: While in Qom, be sure to dress extra conservatively—dark or somber clothes are best.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Men praying at Hazrat-e Masumeh shrine in Qom, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Men praying at the Hazrat-e Masumeh shrine by Franxx

Top things to see in Qom:

  • Hazrat-e Masumeh/Fatimah Masumeh Shrine: Shrine to the sister of Imam Reza, Fatimah, and the second most holy place in Iran.
  • Jameh Mosque: Another grand Friday mosque.
  • Qom Bazaar: Historical covered bazaar, much less crowded than Tehran’s.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The Jamkaran Mosque in Qom, Iran

The Jamkaran Mosque by Fabien Dany

Where to stay in Qom

We recommend going to Qom as a day trip from Tehran. There’s no real reason to stay the night.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Conservative clothes in Qom, Iran

Men and women in conservative clothes by Ralf Schumacher

Transportation from Qom

  • To Tehran by bus: 1.5 hours
  • To Kashan by bus: 2 hours
  • To Esfahan by bus: 5.5 hours

 

A two week Iran travel itinerary - The Agha Bozorg mosque in Kashan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

The Agha Bozorg mosque

Days 5-6: Kashan

We admit: we were disappointed by Kashan. Supposedly “hidden” from mass tourism, it actually overflows with tour groups. Sightseeing opportunities are numerous, but ticket costs quickly add up.

On the other hand, Kashan is en-route to other major destinations and a logical stopover point. Its Old City is filled with the winding alleys and old buildings you surely seek, so perhaps it’s something for you. Everyone’s experience is different, after all.

 

A two week Iran travel itinerary - The roof of the Sultan Amir Ahmad Bathhouse - Lost With Purpose

Looking down on peons below from the Sultan Amir Ahmad Bathhouse

Top things to see in Kashan

  • Fin Gardens: One of several UNESCO-listed Persian gardens.
  • Traditional houses: See how the wealthy merchants of Kashan lived in the numerous traditional houses. They’re expensive at 200,000 rials apiece to enter, but you can buy a ticket for several houses + bathhouse at the ticket office of the Sultan Amir Ahmad Bathhouse.
  • Sultan Amir Ahmad Bathhouse: Ornate vaulted ceilings decorate the inside. On the flip side is an alien dome-covered rooftop.

 

A two week Iran travel itinerary - The view from the roof of the Noghli Guesthouse in Kashan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Not too shabby: the view from the roof of Noghli Guesthouse

Where to stay in Kashan

Kashan’s budget options are limited, as most accommodations are in beautifully restored heritage homes. Some of these have dorms for $10 – 15 a bed.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Skyline of Kashan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

The mountainous skyline of Kashan

Transportation from Kashan

  • Bus to Esfahan: 3 hours
  • Train to Tehran: 4 hours

 

A two week Iran travel itinerary - The Si-o-seh pol bridge in Esfahan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

The 33 arches of Si-o-seh pol in Esfahan

Days 7-9: Esfahan

Esfahan is one of the highlights of Iran. With its glorious mosques, grand bazaar, tasty food and lovely people, it has something on offer for anyone.

Imam square, surrounded by Esfahan’s bazaar and perhaps the most exquisite mosques in the country, can easily take up a day or two. Esfahan is a place not to be rushed, so make sure to slow down, sit on the grass and treat yourself to a saffron ice cream or three.

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Beryani near Jame Mosque in Esfahan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Tip: When in Esfahan, don’t forget to try beryani, the local specialty made of minced mutton, herbs, and fresh bread. Azam Beryani specializes in the dish. They have several locations, but we enjoyed the spot near the Jame Mosque the best. Don’t worry when you see the line—everyone in line is often too happy to let foreigners skip a few places.

Esfahan mosques are certainly its highlight, but the city offers so much more. It has several historic bridges, of which at least Si-o-seh pol is worth a visit. 

 

A two week Iran travel itinerary - The ceiling of the Sheikh Lotfallah mosque in Esfahan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Talk about ceilings! The ceiling of the Sheikh Lotfallah mosque in Imam Square.

Top things to see in Esfahan:

  • Imam Square: Don’t forget to sit down in the grass and enjoy some saffron ice cream.
  • Shah Mosque: This mosque has perhaps one of the most intricate archways in Iran. A must visit.
  • Sheikh Lotfallah Mosque: One of our favorite mosques in Iran. Staring at the ceiling never gets old.
  • Historical bridges on the Zāyanderūd river, notably Si-o-seh Pol: Make sure to visit in the evening, when the bridges are atmospherically lit up, and Iranians flock to enjoy the evening cool.
  • Vank Cathedral: This Armenian cathedral has beautifully ornate frescoes, and rivals anything you’ll see in Armenia itself.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Entrance to the Shah mosque in Esfahan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Entrance to the epic Shah Mosque

Where to stay in Esfahan

Esfahan has plenty of options. From big luxury hotels to small homestay-like hostels. Prices are what you could expect from one of Iran’s most popular cities. We recommend booking ahead in high season.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Saffron ice cream in Esfahan, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Saffron ice cream, the greatest culinary invention since ever.

Transportation from Esfahan

  • Bus to Yazd: 7-8 hours – We recommend an overnight VIP bus to save on time and accommodation
  • Train to Yazd: 3 hours
  • Bus to Tehran: 5 hours
  • Train to Tehran: 7.5 hours
  • Flight to Tehran: 1 hour
  • Bus to Shiraz: 6 – 7 hours

 

A two week photo itinerary for Iran. Includes top places to visit in Iran, things to see in each city, where to stay, and travel times between destinations. Save this if you're considering travel to Iran!

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Two week Iran travel itinerary - Mosque interior in Yazd, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Hazire mosque is near the central Jame Mosque.

Days 10-11: Yazd

Yazd is an exquisitely well preserved and restored town. It’s a quintessential Persian oasis town, with lovely people and ample photo ops. You can easily spend a day or two getting lost in its desert tinted alleys, or admiring the views while relaxing on one of its numerous rooftop cafes.

Yazd is a great place to stick around in, and if you have time we recommend staying a bit longer to visit some of the sights around Yazd. If not, two days is enough to visit the main sights and get a little bit lost.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Amir Chaghmagh mosque lit up at night - Lost With Purpose

Amir Chakhmagh lit up at night

Top things to see in Yazd:

  • Jameh Mosque: Beautiful Friday Mosque in the center or Yazd. Has a grand entrance hall. PRO TIP: visit in the evening, or take the back door, to save on the entry fee.
  • Amir Chakhmagh: Don’t waste your money on the entrance fee, you can have the same view from the guesthouse rooftop next door.
  • Old town alleyways: One of the joys of Yazd is wandering its backstreets. With a bit of imagination you’ll soon be transported back to the 17th century.

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Pigeon tower of Meybod near Yazd, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Off the beaten track tip: Don’t miss the haunting pigeon tower or sprawling Narin castle in nearby Meybod!

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Rooftop views from the best budget hostel in Yazd, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Enjoying the sick rooftop views from the budget-friendly Amir Chakhmagh hostel

Places to stay in Yazd

Yazd has plenty of accommodation. Most of the more upscale places are located around the side streets near the Jame Mosque and Bazaar. We only found one budget place, which can be found next to Amir Chakhmagh.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The traditional and iconic windcatchers (wind towers) of Yazd - Lost With Purpose

The traditional windcatchers of Yazd, used to cool houses down below

Transportation from Yazd

  • Bus to Shiraz: 6 hours – Consider overnighting it.
  • Bus to Tehran: 9 – 10 hours
  • Plane to Tehran: 1 hour

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Nasir al Mulk mosque in Shiraz - Lost With Purpose

The famous Nasir al Mulk mosque in Shiraz

Days 12 – 14: Shiraz

Shirazis (people from Shiraz) have a reputation as being the warmest people in Iran, and it’s easy to see why! The city’s history is decorated by poetry, music, and wine, and its old interior is filled to the brim with yet more stunning architecture. Though the hard line government has deprived the city of its Bacchanalian aspects, Shiraz is still a warm and welcoming place for everyone, and sure to impress.

From Shiraz, you can fly or take a bus back to Tehran. If you have some time left, check out our list of alternative destinations below, or leave the tourist trail with our off the beaten track guide.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The Necropolis near Shiraz, Iran - Lost With Purpose

The tombs of the Necropolis

Top things to see in Shiraz:

  • Nasir al Mulk Mosque: perhaps the most photographed mosque in all of Iran, and for good reason.
  • Shah Cheragh shrine: Shrine to Imam Reza’s brothers. Absolutely gorgeous. Dress appropriately and you might not need a mandatory guide.
  • Tomb of Hafez: Brimming with locals, it’s the tomb of one of Iran’s most exalted poets.
  • Tomb of Saadi: Another mausoleum, this time of the great Persian poet Saadi
  • Vakil Mosque: Yet another dazzling mosque, tucked away in the city’s bazaar.
  • Vakil Bazaar: Winding walkways promising to be filled with everything you never needed and more.
  • Persepolis and Necropolis: For some the reason to visit Iran. The lasting remains of an ancient capital are a sight to behold. An easy day trip from Shiraz.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The Shah Cheragh shrine - Lost With Purpose

The Shah Cheragh shrine

Where to stay in Shiraz

Shiraz lacks reasonable budget options. However, most mid range options are sharply priced for what you get, and are close to most major sights.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Persian carpets in the Vakil Bazaar in Shiraz, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Persian carpets in the Vakil Bazaar

Transportation from Shiraz

  • Plane to Tehran: 1.20 hours
  • Train to Tehran: 14 – 15 hours
  • Bus to Yazd: 7-8 hours –

 

A two week photo itinerary for Iran. Includes top places to visit in Iran, things to see in each city, where to stay, and travel times between destinations. Save this if you're considering travel to Iran!

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Alternative itineraries

 

The route we give covers classic Iran, and is perfect for first-time visitors, especially if you fly into Tehran. It covers genuine highlights, but it’s also a bit mainstream.

Following are some of our favorite places in Iran that are worth a visit, which are guaranteed to be less laden with tour groups. If you have only two weeks, you can fit in one of these destinations by cutting out Qom and/or Kashan. If you have a bit more time, you can easily tack one or two on to your itinerary.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The UNESCO-listed Grand Bazaar of Tabriz, Iran, the largest covered bazaar in the world - Lost With Purpose

The Grand Bazaar of Tabriz, the first ever UNESCO-listed bazaar

Tabriz (2-3 days)

Probably our favorite big city in Iran. Tabrizis are extremely friendly, there’s plenty of interesting sights to be seen, and its UNESCO-listed bazaar is a shopper’s Valhalla. The city’s popularity is sure to pick up due to its close proximity with the Armenian border crossing, but for now it’s blissfully devoid of mass tourism.

How to fit Tabriz into your itinerary: If coming over the border from Armenia or Turkey, make Tabriz your first stop. If starting from Tehran, fly or take an overnight bus from there.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Sunset view of Tabriz, Iran skyline - Lost With Purpose

Sunset views over Tabriz from one of the many hills surrounding the city

Top things to see in Tabriz

  • Bazaar of Tabriz: A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the bazaar of Tabriz is phenomenal. It is one of the oldest bazaars in the region, and one of the largest covered bazaars in world.
  • The Blue Mosque: Dilapidated but still beautiful, this mosque was sadly damaged by an earthquake in 1780. Restoration efforts are in place, but work is progressing slowly.
  • Shah Gölü park: A large artifical lake surrounded by snack stalls, small eateries, and carnival rides. It’s a popular hangout spot for locals, especially in the evenings!
  • Kandovan: Reminiscent of Cappadocia in Turkey, Kandovan is an easy day trip from Tabriz, and a must visit if you’re in the region.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The cave city of Kandovan, Iran near Tabriz - Lost With Purpose

The cave city of Kandovan

Where to stay in Tabriz

Being a big city, Tabriz has a wide array of accommodation available.

  • Budget: There are lots of budget hotels around the Darya Hotel. The Darya used to be cheaper, but being featured in the Lonely Planet has inevitably raised the prices to around $25 for a double.
  • Mid-range: Tabriz Hotel
  • Luxury:  Kaya Laleh Park Hotel

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Hole in the wall cafe for breakfast in Tabriz, Iran - Lost With Purpose

A hole in the wall cafe serving delicious bread, cream and honey for breakfast in the bazaar

Transportation from Tabriz

  • Plane to Tehran: 1 hour
  • Train to Tehran: 12 – 13 hours
  • Bus to Tehran: 8 – 9 hours

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Castles of the Assassins in the Alamut Valley - Lost With Purpose

Atop one of the Castles of the Assassins in the Alamut Valley

The Alamut Valley (2 days)

Home to the famous Castles of the Assassins, the  otherworldly rock formations and fascinating history of the Alamut Valley is hard to forget. Best accessed from Qazvin, the Alamut offer anything from a day trip to multi day hiking opportunities.

How to fit the Alamut Valley into your itinerary: If coming over the border from Armenia or Turkey, you can stop here after Tabriz. Otherwise, head here from Tehran via bus or taxi.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Traditional Persian food in the Alamut Valley, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Delicious zereshk polow (chicken and rice with barberries) in a home at the base of the Alamut Castle

Top things to see in the Alamut Valley

  • Alamut Castle: The ex-fortress of Hassan-e Sabbh. The fortress is no more, though it’s being restored, but the views from the top are absolutely breathtaking.
  • Three canyons: We couldn’t tell you their names, but there are several canyons running alongside one of the roads into the valley. They feature surreal, bulbous rock formations known as “pudding rocks”. Can’t go wrong with a name like that!
  • Garmarud: A small village in the mountains, and the starting point of many treks through the Alamut Valley.

 

Two week Iran travel Itinerary - Canyons in the Alamut Valley - Lost With Purpose

Where to stay in the Alamut Valley

You have two options if not hiking and camping—Qazvin, the nearest city, and Gazor Khan, a village at the base of the Alamut Castle mountain 2.5 hours from Qazvin.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - A lake in the Alamut Valley, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Transportation times from Qazvin

  • Train to Tehran: 2 hours
  • Bus to Tehran: 3 – 4 hours
  • Bus to Rasht: 3 hours

 

A two week photo itinerary for Iran. Includes top places to visit in Iran, things to see in each city, where to stay, and travel times between destinations. Save this if you're considering travel to Iran!

Pin it!

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Shrine of Imam Reza in Mashhad, Iran

The Shrine of Imam Reza by Costas Tavernarakis

Mashhad (2 days)

Mashhad is Iran’s holiest city, and it shows. The glittering minarets of the Shrine to Imam Reza rise above the city’s skyline, the streets are filled with pilgrims, and black is the color of choice for almost all women on the street. There’s not much to see in Mashhad aside from the shrine, but it’s worth it. It’s not every day you can see the resting place of one of the 12 imams, some of the holiest people in Shia Islam.

How to fit Mashhad into your itinerary: Mashhad is far away from literally everything in Iran. If you’re pressed for time, you need to fly there. If you have a bit more wiggle room, you can take an overnight train or bus from Tehran to Mashhad and back.

 

Top things to see in Mashhad

  • Shrine to Imam Reza: A sprawling, ornate masterpiece that needs to be seen to be believed. Girls will need to wear chador, and no cameras are allowed inside.
  • Kang: A stepped village near Mashhad. Perfect for a day trip.
  • Torbat-e Jam: Another small village with a beautiful mosque and mausoleum near the border of Afghanistan. Here’s how to get there.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - A tomb in Torbat-e Jam near Mashhad, Iran - Lost With Purpose

A lively tomb in Torbat-e Jam

Where to stay in Mashhad

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Bus terminal in Mashhad, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Transportation from Mashhad

  • Plane to Tehran: 1.20 hours
  • Train to Tehran: 10 – 11 hours
  • Bus to Tehran: 10 – 11 hours

 

Two week Iran travel Itinerary - Sunrise over the Kaluts desert near Kerman, Iran - Lost With Purpose

A still sunrise over the Kaluts desert

Kerman and the Kaluts (2 days)

Southern Kerman is quite a hike from anything else in Iran, but the Kaluts desert (also known as the Dasht-e Lut desert) makes the trip worth your while. The overwhelmingly stark silence of the desert is enough to calm even the most restless of minds, and the surreal “sand castles” will transport you to another world entirely.

How to fit Kerman into your itinerary: You can overnight bus to Kerman from Shiraz or Yazd. Alternatively, if you have the funds you can fly to Kerman’s airport from Tehran, Esfahan, or Shiraz.

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Rayen citadel near Kerman, Iran - Lost With Purpose

Rayen citadel makes for a nice day trip from Kerman

Top things to see in Kerman and the Kaluts

  • The Kaluts desert: Of course!
  • Old caravanserai: An abandoned caravanserai in Shahdad, a small desert town at the edge of the Kaluts.
  • Vakil traditional tea house: An old tea house in a historic bath inside Kerman’s bazaar, often offering live music.
  • Rayen citadel: A restored ancient city, and a nice alternative to the destroyed Bam citadel
  • Shazdeh garden: A beautiful Persian garden near Kerman

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - Shahdad desert town near Kerman, Iran - Lost With Purpose

The town of Shahdad near the Kaluts

Where to stay in Kerman

 

Two week Iran travel itinerary - The Kaluts desert in Iran - Lost With Purpose

Transportation times from Kerman

  • Bus to Shiraz: 7 – 8 hours
  • Bus to Yazd: 5 – 6 hours
  • Plane to Tehran: 1.5 hours

 

Resources for travel in Iran

 

Interactive route map

Click on the icon in the top right to view a larger version of the map.

 

A two week photo itinerary for Iran. Includes top places to visit in Iran, things to see in each city, where to stay, and travel times between destinations. Save this if you're considering travel to Iran!

Want to save this for later? Pin it!

 

Yay transparency! Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. If you buy or book something with our links, we’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Think of it as a way of saying thanks for making the itinerary 🙂

Sebastiaan

Just another Dutchie. Extrovert with introverted tendencies. Some say I'm lazy, I say I'm masterfully inactive.

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55 thoughts on “Photo itinerary: two weeks in Iran

    Goodness! How long did you take to craft this amazing post? There’s SO MUCH INFO here!

    Also, the amount of memories you guys made travelling Iran must be so overwhelming!

    We had to put some effort in it, but we’re glad with the end result, so it was totally worth it. Thanks for the compliments!

    Travels of a Bookpacker says:

    Brilliant guide! Did you extend your visas while you were there? Was it easy to do? We are planning at least a month but would love the option of staying longer!

    Thanks a lot. We extended our visa in Yazd, and it was quite easy. We wrote a short guide about it at https://www.lostwithpurpose.com/iran-visa-extension-yazd/. Check it out.

    GlobeTrove says:

    My grandparents traveled to Iran years ago and worked there for a while. The stories that my grandmom tells till date makes me long to visit the country. Someday I will. These photographs really pointed out why I need to pull it up higher on my to do list.

    You have some bad ass grandparents then. Cheers to them. Hopefully you can follow in their travelers footsteps.

    Suzannah Freeman says:

    Wow! This is one seriously good guide. Iran looks absolutely breathtakingly stunning! Thanks so much for writing this, I’m going to Pin it immediately.

    Thanks for the compliment, and for sharing. Cheers!

    Ellis Veen says:

    Excellent guide and bringing back many memories of my own trip. It is such a beautiful country. I did try beryani in Esfahan, but it honestly was not my favourite. The saffron icecreams (yes, i had multiple, hard to withstand) were delicious tough. Qom can also be done on the route to Kashan by the way. I took a bus to Qom, got out, took a taxi, visited the mosque and shrine then continued by bus to Kashan.

    That’s good to know about Qom and Kashan. We’ll add to to the guide. Cheers and thanks!

    ommekolsoum says:

    Thank you so much. Qom has some tourist attractions that have unique national and international ranks which have not been talked a lot so far: The breathtaking beauty of Hauz Soltan Lake, Seasonal marshes which are the temporary residence of rare polar birds, The panorama of the beautiful Desert, Iran’s largest , tallest, and most beautiful Timcheh, Iran’s most beautiful and diverse tiling in Hadrat Masoume’s Holy Shrine, The discovered earthenware which belong to 6000 B.C., Gray earthenware which is related to Iron Age, Iran’s most beautiful and delicate hand-women carpets, Sohan(Qom sweets), Handicrafts: Ceramic-making. Tile-making,Ring-making,and… .I am a tour guide in Qom, you can guest me at Qom ,my cellphone number :+989102806008

    Probearoundthe Globe says:

    Thank you! I still haven’t planned my 2 weeks in Iran, although I leave in less than 3 weeks! This is really helpful. I really want to add on Kerman so thanks for the pointers

    Going without plans is totally fine, too, but hopefully this gave you some inspiration. The Kaluts are magical, we highly recommend it if you can make it to Kerman,

    I just cannot get enough of the colors of Iran. It’s mind-blowing! Thank you for all of these photos! Happy continued travels 🙂

    It’s definitely a sensory overload…in the best of ways. Cheers!

    This is such an informative guide! I had never really thought about Iran but after finding your blog a few weeks ago and reading a few articles you’ve got me hooked. The architecture looks so beautiful. Thanks so much for sharing and opening my eyes to new destinations!

    That’s the biggest compliment you can give us. Thanks a lot! Hope you get to visit soon. Cheers.

    Maartje says:

    Wowww stunning photos and itinerary! You captured the colours, ambiance and details incredibly well.

    Thanks a lot!. To be honest, the country makes it easy with all the grandeur and beauty everywhere.

    Talia says:

    I really enjoyed the photos, a nice glimpse of life in Iran. After reading this I have every intention to visit Iran now. So much history and colors and the people seem just as warm and friendly as I gathered from your guide. Very thorough guide!

    Thanks for the compliments. We cannot recommend Iran enough. Definitely a must visit destination.

    Marissa says:

    I’m from the U.S., and looking at your beautiful photos makes me want to cry. I am so eager to visit this beautiful country – I absolutely love Middle Eastern architecture and I have heard the people are incredibly warm and welcoming – but it seems that my visit will have to wait. Thank you for sharing your beautiful photographs and tips for how to spend two weeks in Iran!

    Such a shame recent events have put a damper on US citizens traveling to Iran at all. Let’s hope it’s resolved soon that you too can enjoy this marvelous country!

    Hannah Logan says:

    I’m really considering going to Iran this year. Shiraz especially has been on my radar, but after reading this I’ve added a couple other musts to my list! Thank you 🙂

    We can only recommend it. It’s definitely going to be a tourist hot spot very soon.

    WanderingRedHead says:

    This post is beyond amazing. You are a great story teller and love your sense of adventure to discover all these off the beaten track destinations. Inspiring!

    You are too kind. Thanks a lot!

    Kathi Kamleitner says:

    This itinerary and the photos make me want to pack my bags immediately! I’ve ways been fascinated with Iran, but now it’s even higher up on my bucket list!!

    Hopefully you get to soon. It’s a gorgeous place!

    Aireona93 says:

    I love the detail that you went into for your itinerary. It looks really great; I wish I could go. :3 Maybe in the future. Anyway, great job. Loved this post.

    Thanks a lot. We figured what’s the use if we don’t put the info you need in it. Hope you can visit one day. Cheers!

    Justine Cross says:

    This is a truly incredible post. I had no idea Iran was so beautiful! I’m impressed at your courage to spend 2 weeks travelling through. Thanks for the tip about saffron ice-cream – one luxury I totally have to try!

    Thanks a lot. Traveling to Iran doesn’t take that much courage. It’s a super safe country for travelers. We actually spend two months, since we liked it so much.

    You must try the ice cream, it’s the best!

    mariana says:

    I understand you visited Kurdistan but didn’t include Palangan in your itinerary. Would you favor all this destinations over Palangan, or does this area take too much time to be considered in such short itinerary?

    Would you consider doing a detailed itinerary for Pakistan? It’s even harder to find good detailed information to Pakistan!

    We mention Palangan in our off the beaten track itinerary (https://www.lostwithpurpose.com/off-the-beaten-track-iran/). It’s definitely worth a visit, but we don’t think its easily combined with the more classical highlights mentioned in this itinerary.

    mariana says:

    Thanks! Yes, I saw that post before! 🙂

    What about for Pakistan, would you consider doing something like this? I love your posts from Pakistan but I would love to understand what places would you recommend going to or which ones are just not worth it. There is such lack of information on the internet for places like that I would love if you made some updated practical itinerary like this one as not a lot of people visit these days.

    We’re considering doing two for Pakistan: one for the north and one for the south. We wanted to wait to get more first hand info and visit more places (we were planning to visit again), but since we won’t be visiting anytime soon we might just make one with the places we did visit,

    mariana says:

    Thank you so much, I’m really looking forward, it will be such a big help for future travelers like me! Your posts are always so inspiring but also being very helpful and that is hard to conjugate.

    Hopefully you’ll find a way to get the visa issue sorted away from your home country in the future!

    This is awesome! I haven’t been to Iran for years, and these pictures are simply superb. And great itinerary ideas! Tickling my itchy feet! :p

    Thanks a lot. It’s a pretty standard route, but includes genuine highlights, so we’re glad people like it. Cheers!

    Talk about comprehensive! Wow. Iran is extremely high (read: TOP) of our bucket list, so this guide is absolutely essential reading for us!

    That’s great to hear. We have a bunch of other articles on Iran too, so let us know if you have any more questions. When do you plan on going? Cheers!

    Puria Golkaramy says:

    Hello guys i really really really enjoyed ure blog i am persian and i would love to help anyone who attempts to visit iran just cantact with me by Gmail [email protected] and I’ll be more than willing to answer your questions and help you find homestay or figure out the prices of stuff and everything! I personally live in qazvin and almost everyone is welcome in my home.
    have nice visit.

    Hi. Thank you so much. That’s very kind of you. I bet our readers appreciate it a lot, too. Cheers!

    Sin Dee says:

    Love the info details which helps alot. I’ll be going in less than 4 weeks time and I have not firm up anything yet. Any idea what’s the best way about changing all expenses in Toman or just enough and change the remaining with Euro as the Toman will be in super big stack of cash to carry for a slightly over 2 weeks travel.

    Sebastiaan says:

    Glad this post is useful. Not entirely sure what you’re asking us, though. You should bring enough cash (USD or EURO) to cover your expenses for the time you’re in Iran, and then some. You can easily change USD or EURO to rial at money changers in the big cities. The stacks of cash are large, but it’s still manageable. We usually changed around $100-200 at a time.

    sinnie says:

    Hi there
    It’s a marvellous blog & feel that you two of 20′ are doing very well.
    I found 1-error on ‘Abanyeh’ mentioned in ‘top things to see in Mashhad’, where it should be around in Kashan not Mashhad?? Is the one you mean: “Kang” = a stepped village also?
    Cheers

    Sebastiaan says:

    Thank you so much for pointing that out. Will change it right away!

    Jasvir Kaur says:

    I’ve been clinging to your blogs for past 2 days now, I was just randomly looking for some travel blogs (I love reading about different places) and I am so glad that I came across your website. All the information, images are very refreshing, I am totally in love with you guys. I love how you put your experience into words/images, I think i am never going to get over your blogs. I wish you travel to many more places and keep posting. Love the good work, keep it going 🙂 <3

    Sebastiaan says:

    That’s so great to hear, thanks a lot. Any favorite destinations?

    Ommekolsoum says:

    Thank you so much for pointing that out. Qom has some tourist attractions that have unique national and international ranks which have not been talked a lot so far: The breathtaking beauty of Hauz Soltan Lake, Seasonal marshes which are the temporary residence of rare polar birds, The panorama of the beautiful Desert, Iran’s largest , tallest, and most beautiful Timcheh, Iran’s most beautiful and diverse tiling in Hadrat Masoume’s Holy Shrine, The discovered earthenware which belong to 6000 B.C., Gray earthenware which is related to Iron Age, Iran’s most beautiful and delicate hand-women carpets, Sohan(Qom sweets), Handicrafts: Ceramic-making. Tile-making,Ring-making,and…

    Sharanya Iyer says:

    This is the MOTHER of all itinerary posts I’ve ever read. I don’t exaggerate. Thank you for this, I’m contemplating a couple of weeks in Iran this year and this is going to help me plan it. Say, did you feel you’d’ve felt fine there as a solo female traveler? I’m an Indian, so I’m more than used to intrusive perusals of my person on the streets, but otherwise, just wondering what the day to day people interactions there are like? Especially on overnight buses?
    Again, thank you for putting in the effort to pen out comprehensive guides like this! 🙂

    shivar travel agency says:

    hello, my name is atieh and im a travel expert at Shevar Travel Agency, i just read your article about your trip, its fascinating!! so i decide to reach you to let you know that we operates Incoming tours and our agency offers amazing wide range of tours in Iran. we will be glad if you are interested. feel free to contact us then we can inform you about the details.

    With best wishes,
    atieh

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