Rolling with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

A high tale of rolling around with stoners in Pakistan, and being reminded that people around the world are not so different after all.

 

Through the thick haze of hashish clouds, I survey the room. The scene before my eyes is uncannily similar to bygone days, a scene that any stoner is all too familiar with.

It’s a boxy living room, still under construction, in a small village in the Hunza Valley in Pakistan. A group of men are scattered around the room, sprawled on pillows and makeshift cushions. A patterned rug, covered with crumbs and dirt, adds a splash of color to the floor. Eyes squint, hiding reddish overtones, and giggles and laughter erupt periodically, sometimes at nothing, sometimes at everything. Everyone is supposed to be working, but everyone is high instead.

Rolling with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

There are large pots of unidentifiable (but tasty) pasta concoctions in the center of the room to appease munchies-ridden stomachs. Next to the pots are heaping piles of freshly picked fruit, the only discernible difference between a college dorm and the Hunza house. Devouring kilos of fresh cherries is much more preferable than working one’s way through family-sized bags of cheesy puffs.

Fresh cherries and apricots while smoking with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

All of the quintessential stoner characters are present:

The Bullshitter

At center stage is a man that looks like Ryan Gosling’s alcoholic Pakistani brother. An arrogant local from the village, who spent some time as a city boy in Pakistan’s capital, spins tales about how he destroyed a car the other week, knocked up a girl in a local village without marrying her, and sometimes drinks 1-2 bottles of the local liquor per day. Everyone says he drinks too much, but he provides others with cigarettes and joints, so the complaints are kept to a minimum.

Rolling with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

The merry band of miscreants.

The Antagonizer

Across from the Bullshitter, a lanky man with bright blue eyes is egging him on with a grin. He doesn’t really believe any of the tales spewing from his mouth, he’s simply enjoying harassing the high storyteller, encouraging him to continue on with his dashing yet dastardly tales.

The Shaman

A proclaimed shaman in a stark white shalwar kameez is slumped against some pillows. He has a thick head of hair despite being 67, his eyes are reduced to red slits, and he often has a silly grin on his face. He is a famous figure in the community, loved by all and often sought out for advice and blessings in exchange for food or money. He is watching the former two with disgust, thinly resisting the urge to punch the Bullshitter in the face (not for the first time).

The shaman, whom we met while rolling with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

The Moocher

There is a man lurking against one of the walls, periodically repositioning himself in the line in hopes of getting another puff of the joint. His hash supply has run dry, and his pleads for a gift from the group sparks an argument about who smokes whose hash, and who paid for the hash last time.

The Hippie

A man with long, scraggly, unwashed hair and a thick white beard sits in a patch of sunlight by the window. His English sentences are often punctuated by long yeeeeeeahhhh! and riiiiiiiight!, and he enjoys rambling about abstract topics such as the “universality” of humanity. We met him while smoking the day before, and he was the one to introduce us to the village people. He alternates between smoking cigarettes and rolling joints to share with the crowd.

The hippie smoking with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

The Bitch(es)

In one corner, a young boy with a baby face squats next to a pot atop a gas burner. He is the youngest in the room, the lowest fish in the food chain. He is the bitch of the group, currently delegated to making chai for the guests.

The other bitch of the group is regularly sent outside by the Bullshitter to simultaneously fetch more fresh fruit and continue on with the construction work that everyone else in the room is neglecting.

Stoners in Hunza, Pakistan smoking a "desi joint".

Questions, questions

We while away the lazy afternoon hours. Dozens of joints are passed around as conversation flits back and forth between characters. The hippie, our companion for the day, periodically translates snippets of the Burushaski and Urdu conversations for us. Given the Bullshitter’s gift of gab, he mostly translates his escapades with a defeated shake of his head, but the occasional, more poignant question sneaks its way in between his rambling.

One of the men asks if smoking marijuana is a thing in our countries. Sebastiaan responds that smoking is basically legal in the Netherlands–you can buy weed and hashish in stores. When the hippie translates his response, the men’s eyes widen in wonder, and they giggle and elbow each other.

Rolling with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

Weed may be the crop of choice at home, but in Pakistan, hashish is king.

Another man, upon hearing that I’m from the United States, blinks in surprise. “America make Pakistan very bad place,” he says slowly, cautiously. The hippie translates the rest for him: “Is it true? Is Pakistan so bad?”

I smile, spreading my arms. “If I believed everything the news said about Pakistan, I wouldn’t be here, would I?” He grins back.

“People in Pakistan are just people, not terrorists. They are the same as people all over the world.” I gesture around the hazy room, at all of his friends scattered about, “In America, my home, we do the same.” And it’s true–I can easily match a friend’s face to each character in the room, and fortunately or unfortunately, I’ve spent days of my life mirroring this scene. Add a Bob Marley poster on the wall somewhere, and it would be an exact match.

Humans

Hours later, we stumble out of the hazy house to a chorus of goodbyes and waves. As we make our way down the rocky village path, my thoughts float back to the room.

There are thousands of different cultures, different languages, different people in the world. We live on an incredibly diverse little planet, one where you can find a completely different culture by flying for two hours in any direction.

Yet, despite the diversity, it’s the similarities that make me smile most. From a party of Georgian girls and guys dancing to Rihanna in their car, to Iranian teenagers giggling when they learn that Dutch teens also watch movies with friends, to Pakistani stoners hanging out, getting the munchies, and shooting the moon, I realize how, at the most basic level, people around the world are the same–not different. Despite differing customs, lives, and languages, we are all just humans.

 

A high tale: rolling around with some stoners in Pakistan, and being reminded that people around the world are more similar than different.

Don’t miss our most popular post about Pakistan: 5 serious dangers of traveling in Pakistan

Alex

American by birth, British by passport, Filipina by appearance. Addicted to ice cream. Enjoys climbing trees, dislikes falling out. Has great fondness for goats which is usually not reciprocated.

More about Alex Reynolds

21 thoughts on “Rolling with the stoners in Hunza, Pakistan

    Saleha Tariq says:

    Awesome post ? No doubt we all are similar in one or the other way…all we need to do is to respect our differences in order to make this planet a peaceful place to live in… The chaos today’s world is suffering from is because we don’t tolerate each other’s differences…as a result we fail to acknowledge alot of good prevailing in the world..what if we love, respect and honour each and every human without any discrimination this world can turn out into a better place to live in !!!
    A great job done by writing this beautiful piece ??

    We’re so happy to meet so many wonderful people, but in the real world and online, that share our view of openness and tolerance! You’re absolutely right, and let’s hope the world will keep moving towards acceptance and peace.

    Saleha Tariq says:

    Lets hope for a bright peaceful future fr our earth ?? do write often on topics relevant to development of tolerance and patience among different regions , countries , races and religions ?

    Boo Long says:

    These replies are just as good to see as the original article. I’m in Britain and so much of the mainstream news makes people wrongly think everyone in Pakistan is a religious extremist. I hope some of them get to read the replies on here and see that most people are lovely all over the world.

    Morpheus says:

    question is did you enjoy the cheap weed?

    Quality Peshawari hashish is much more prefered in this neck of the woods 😉

    Muhammad Shoaib says:

    While reading all of this, I imagined you doing all of this. Was any of this (hash/weed) a surprise to you?

    We were mostly surprised by how open everyone was about it. We knew hash was a part of daily life here, but we expected people to be more hush hush about it.

    Muhammad Shoaib says:

    Thank you for visiting Pakistan, I hope you will visit us again :)))))))))))

    No need to thank us, we had an awesome time. We’re trying to go back this winter.

    Muhammad Shoaib says:

    Yayy .. 😀 😀

    Muhammad Shoaib says:

    Winters are here, Just a friendly reminder 😉

    Muhammad Shoaib says:

    There was a time (When I was about 6-8 years old, I am 26 now) I used to see foreigners from around the world roaming FREELY (without security) in Karkhana Market (Peshawar) and than I am seeing the time when we are totally isolated from the world.
    Steps like what “Lost with purpose” have taken should be encouraged and appreciated so that more and more people from around the world should be invited to see what people of Pakistan and Pakistan itself has to offer.

    P.S I read all your blogs, and awaiting for you to come in Winters :))))

    Kristina Brendley says:

    LOVE this post. You guys are awesome. 🙂

    Thank you, that’s too kind of you ?

    What a splendid post and love the fact that you have connected it so well to daily life in general.

    More power and adventures to you.

    Sebastiaan says:

    Thanks a lot. It’s just super interesting to see that no matter where you are, people are fundamentally not that different. It’s something you never really see when you’re just glued to CNN or something 😉

    Boo Long says:

    Lovely article. It’s so true we are more similar than different. People should read more things like this, written by real human travellers rather than CNN (etc) sensationalist divisive news.

    Sebastiaan says:

    We are reminded of this on a daily basis, no matter how remote we are. At the end of the day, people all long for a hot meal and good company, no matter what their background is. Let’s hope people start realizing this.

    Pakistani420tourist says:

    Greenie was an absolute blessing to my crew during our stay in Pakistan. We are seasonal veterans and we’ve never experienced service like Greenie! He was very informing, process was quick and timely, and he had MUCH patience with the many different groups buying through our crew. The bud was quality and he even threw us some discounts and papers on our larger orders! Needless to say, we went back for round 2 and will DEFINITELY be using Greenie ( local420delivery [add] gmail com ) every year!! (:

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